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Record 15/64
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Detail. Methodist Episcopal General Conference, held at Napanee, August, 1874. "Fifth Day. The question of the election of a Bishop was, according to a previous order, taken up. The delegations were much divided in their opinions, the first ballot bringing forward the names of several candidates, Dr. Carman and Rev. B. Lane, M.A., securing the highest number of votes. Upon a second ballot, Rev. A. Carman, M.A., D.D., President of Albert College, was elected to this high office." (Napanee Standard) Albert Carman was born in Matilda township in 1833. He was United Empire Loyalist on both his father and his mother's side, and proud of it. He entered Victoria College (Cobourg) in 1851. In 1854, he experienced an intense, personal religious conversion and subsequently entered the Methodist church. Almost immediately, he was appointed to the new Belleville Seminary. When it became Albert College in 1866, Carman was its first President and continued in the office until 1875. He obtained full, ministerial status in 1864, having never served on a church circuit. Carman was an unusual man, combining respect for education with belief in an evangelical, individual piety as experienced by his farming ancestors. In the 1860's, many Methodists were deeply distrustful of higher education and did not care for educated clergy. It was mostly due to Carman that this resistance was overcome, as he was committed to raising the standards for training future Methodist leaders. Carman was on record as favouring union between the Wesleyan Methodists and the Methodist Episcopaleans. His election as bishop made union more likely. With other Methodists, he developed a formular for union which he defended to another conference of the Methodist Episcopalean Church, which was also held in Napanee in January, 1883. Carman's combination of conservative fundamentalism and leadership helped Canadian Methodism by establishing its uncompromising opposition to vice, but ironically the same qualities later handicapped the advancement of the Methodist Church in the evolving secular world of the late 19th century. (Dictionary of Canadian Biography) Carmen lived a long and influential life. Born in 1833, he remembered Ontario as Upper Canada. The First World War was taking Canada into the twentieth century when he died in 1917.
Rev. Albert Carman -Exhibit #3 The Methodist Episcopal Conference of 1874 -Credit: The Lennox and Addington County Museum and Archives
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Rev. Albert Carman

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Last modified on: October 09, 2008